How the Mother God Got Spayed

I was reading April DeConick‘s article “Biblical Views: How the Mother God Got Spayed” in the Biblical Archaeology Review. While I enjoyed it, I imagine that a few fundamentalists’ heads will explode after reading this article.

So what happened to the Mother Spirit in Christianity? She was neutered (or spayed, if you prefer) as the language shifted from Aramaic into Greek, where “spirit” lost her female coding. In Hebrew and Aramaic, “spirit” is a feminine word. In Greek, it is a neuter word. In Latin, it is a masculine word.

Check it out, I think you’ll enjoy the article and the rest of Biblical Archaeology Review for that matter.

Review: Angels, Miracles, and Heavenly Encounters: Real-Life Stories of Supernatural Events

Angels, Miracles, and Heavenly Encounters: Real-Life Stories of Supernatural Events
by James Stuart Bell
Paperback: 256 pages
Publisher: Bethany House Publishers
ISBN-10: 0764209582
ISBN-13: 978-0764209581

From the Back Cover
There’s more going on in the world than meets the eye.

There is an unseen spiritual realm, and occasionally God allows us glimpses of it. Angels, Miracles, and Heavenly Encounters offers a fascinating look at the supernatural world. It includes more than forty true stories of miraculous provision, encounters with angels and demons, near-death experiences, and incredible rescues.

You’ll marvel at how God and His angels are working behind the scenes to protect and guide us. And you’ll be comforted by glimpses of the peace that awaits us in heaven. The God who pulled back the curtain for a moment in the lives of these writers is the same God who works all things together for our good.

Whether you’re simply curious about the supernatural world or longing for a fresh experience of God’s presence, these amazing stories will touch your heart and strengthen your faith in the God of miracles.

My thoughts:

As you can tell from the title, Angels, Miracles, and Heavenly Encounters is a myriad of supernatural tales told from a Christian perspective. A couple stories teared up big bad Barry, a few got a laugh, still others got a shake of the head, and ultimately I finished the book disgusted. If you are a skeptic this book will have you pulling out your hair, because there is no effort to debunk the stories. Having said that, the book is clearly targeted for those Christians who are open to the supernatural.

The book is edited by James Stuart Bell and ends with his own story. I have to say that I wouldn’t want Bell as a guest at my house. He believed that a fallen wardrobe was a sign of evil spirits and the cure was to burn the books of “… paranormal activity, Eastern religions, and occult books” of a future in-law.

The next morning we gathered up the books, snuck out of the side door, and created a small conflagration in the field behind the house. I figured if we got caught, I’d be packing my bag back to the States.

Nice work James, what do you plan on burning next? Maybe some of those nasty witches or pagans.

There are some good short stories in Angels, Miracles, and Heavenly Encounters but I really don’t think that I can recommend the book of a man who burns other spiritual books. I would suggest to Mr. Bell that he would be a better man if he read more books instead of burning them! I will not score the book; I will just say that I do not recommend Angels, Miracles, and Heavenly Encounters to anyone.


Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Bethany House Publishers. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Review: Wicca: What’s the Real Deal?

Wicca: What’s the Real Deal? Breaking Through the Misconceptions
by Dayna Winters, Patricia Gardner, and Angela Kaufman
Paperback: 176 pages
Publisher: Schiffer Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN-10: 0764339087
ISBN-13: 978-0764339080

(Barry’s score 4 stars out of 5)

Product description:

Witches are everywhere! You can find them in your local schools, workplace, or community. They are your friends, colleagues, neighbors, and sometimes family members. But what do you really know about them? Break through your misconceptions with this groundbreaking, comprehensive guide showcasing Wicca and Witchcraft, written in a simple myth/truth format. Three Witches, elders in the pagan community, take on wiccan-related fallacies still present in society today. They invite Wiccans to come out of the broom closet and they encourage understanding of the tenets of Wicca by those just interested in learning about the basics. This book will serve as a tool for parents and family members who seek to appreciate a loved one s religious choices, and it will help those seeking to separate the truth about modern Witchcraft from centuries of misinformation.

My thoughts:

The authors of “Wicca: What’s the Real Deal?” attempt to tackle the impossible task of changing hearts and minds. While this book is an excellent resource for those who want to learn more about Wicca, I wonder how many readers will have an open mind and heart? At any rate, I really enjoyed it and I see it as an important learning tool for those seeking to understand the faith of a loved one.

As is my usual habit, I thumbed to the back of the book to look at the Glossary, Resources, End-notes, Bibliography, and Index. I was really impressed, however, I might suggest moving the Glossary to the front of the book. Having said that, I was really impressed with the documentation. “Wicca: What’s the Real Deal?” is an excellent springboard for further study.

The book takes popular myths about Wicca and gives clarifying responses. It’s really a clever technique to dispel odd, but not uncommon, beliefs about Wicca. In a few cases, the answers begged to be explained in more depth and at other times smacked of a little straw-man. I suppose the one that stuck out in my mind was the 3am alleged Devil’s hour. I would like to see some documentation of 3am as the Devil’s hour, from what I have found the 3am time is based on nothing more than popular Fiction like ” Exorcism of Emily Rose,” and TV shows like Paranormal State.

All in all, “Wicca: What’s the Real Deal” is excellent. I recommend it and give it a solid 4 stars out of 5!


Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Schiffer Publishing at the request of the author Dayna Winters. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

In my mailbox, June 30

A pair of great looking titles landed in my mailbox this week.

The Kingmakers (Vampire Empire, Book 3)

Expect to see this little steampunky horror gem about September. I’ll let you know if it’s a good bang for the buck long before it hits the bookstores.

Wicca: What’s the Real Deal? Breaking Through the Misconceptions

I’ve thumbed through this one and it looks awesome. I can’t wait to read it.

Book Description
Publication Date: July 28, 2011
Witches are everywhere! You can find them in your local schools, workplace, or community. They are your friends, colleagues, neighbors, and sometimes family members. But what do you really know about them? Break through your misconceptions with this groundbreaking, comprehensive guide showcasing Wicca and Witchcraft, written in a simple myth/truth format. Three Witches, elders in the pagan community, take on wiccan-related fallacies still present in society today. They invite Wiccans to come out of the broom closet and they encourage understanding of the tenets of Wicca by those just interested in learning about the basics. This book will serve as a tool for parents and family members who seek to appreciate a loved one s religious choices, and it will help those seeking to separate the truth about modern Witchcraft from centuries of misinformation.

If you are interested in this title, it is already out (link).

New Spiritual Books

The esoteric minded person should be interested in a pair of new books to hit the bookstores.

Jesus Through Pagan Eyes: Bridging Neopagan Perspectives with a Progressive Vision of Christ

For Pagans and Christians alike, Jesus Through Pagan Eyes offers a provocative portrait of  Jesus—as a compassionate, life-affirming, nature-inspired spiritual teacher, freed from the limiting ideology of the Church. Rev. Mark Townsend sets the stage by exploring the historical evidence of who Jesus was as a human being before delving into the realm of metaphor and mythology, the notion of Christ, and the Church’s conception of Jesus as Christ.

The heart of this unique book lies in the thoughtful and deeply moving collection of stories, essays, and interviews about Jesus from today’s most respected Pagan, Wiccan, and Druidic leaders. Contributors such as Maxine Sanders, Christopher Penczak, Janet Farrar, Diana Paxson, Philip Carr-Gomm, Oberon Zell-Ravenheart, John Michael Greer, Selena Fox, and Raven Grimassi explore the historical figure of Jesus in relation to Witchcraft, the tarot, goddess worship, and shamanism—while illustrating how this god of the Christian church blesses and inspires those who embrace non-traditional spiritual paths.

Whether you envision Jesus as an ascended master, a human teacher, or a mythic god-man, this remarkable book will introduce you to a Jesus who fits fully into the Pagan imagination.  (link)

Jesus Through Pagan Eyes sounds like an interesting title, but I know a lady who really needs the next title.

The Magickal Retreat: Making Time for Solitude, Intention & Rejuvenation

When was the last time you took a break from the busyness of everyday life and worked magick just for your own delight? The more hectic life is, the more important it is to take time to refresh and recharge your spirit.

This easy-to-use workbook walks you through the process of creating a personal and rejuvenating magickal experience. Using Joseph Campbell’s model of the hero’s journey, this inspiring book helps you identify your intention and tailor a retreat to meet your needs. You’ll also find individual retreat plans for specifically focusing on:

—Magickal Skills

—Pathwork

—Home Arts

—Arts and Crafts Green Magick

—Physical and Magickal Wellness

—Psychic Arts Cosmological Practices

—Ceremonial or Ritual Magick Dark Arts

—Science and Technomagick

With this guidebook, you’ll set your goal, choose a format—seclusion, sanctuary, vigil, or vision quest—and determine the time, place, and activities desired. You’ll return from your retreat renewed and energized, with a clear vision of how to integrate the wisdom you learned into your daily life.

Packed with creative ideas, you (or your group) will want to use this book over and over again—anytime you feel the need to slow down, step out of the ordinary, and revive yourself in your own private, sacred, magickal space.(link)

New spiritual book available: Dreaming the Soul Back Home

A new spiritual book hit the shelves two days ago. How’s that for fresh?

Dreaming the Soul Back Home: Shamanic Dreaming for Healing and Becoming Whole

In this extraordinary book, shamanic dream teacher Robert Moss shows us how to become shamans of our own souls and healers of our own lives.

The greatest contribution of the ancient shamans to modern healing is the understanding that in the course of any life we are liable to suffer soul loss — the loss of parts of our vital energy and identity — and that to be whole and well, we must find the means of soul recovery. Moss teaches that our dreams give us maps we can use to find and bring home our lost or stolen soul parts. He shows how to recover animal spirits and ride the windhorse of spirit to places of healing and adventure in the larger reality. We discover how to heal ancestral wounds and open the way for culturalsoul recovery.

You’ll learn how to enter past lives, future lives, and the life experiences of parallel selves and bring back lessons and gifts. “It’s not just about keeping soul in the body,” Moss writes. “It’s about growing soul, becoming more than we ever were before.” With fierce joy, he incites us to take the creator’s leap and bring something new into our world.

New spiritual book

Another cool looking book to hit he shelves this week. If you are as interested in spiritual books as I am, you might want to give this book a try … it’s certainly one of the longest titles for a book that I’ve seen recently.

The Feng Shui Home: Creating spiritual spaces in your environment with altars and shrines, space clearing and the ancient Chinese art of Feng Shui

A home should be a peaceful oasis, providing a calm refuge from stress and tension. This unique book is full of inspirational ideas, practical advice, beautiful photographs and helpful hints and tips to enhance the harmony of your living environment. Learn the ancient principles of feng shui and space clearing, and nurture the emotional aspect of your home with personal altars. With 650 photographs and illustrations, this book offers ways to bring better vibrational energy into your life.

The Middle Way by Scott Nicholson

Scott Nicholson
Haunted Computer Books
http://www.hauntedcomputer.com

In many ways, I’ve felt my writing was a journey or search for answers. 

If you look, you can find most of my flaws, both of the moral kind and the grammatical kind. I’ve always been the sort who claims them and owns them, though maybe I don’t always celebrate them. In both writing and my free-lance editing, I’ve uncovered major thematic issues that are affecting the writer, often without his or her knowledge. 

Sometimes it’s rather disturbing, unless you accept that the act of writing is a path of understanding, communicating, and maybe healing. I’m not one of these writers who say “I only write for myself,” because ultimately that is a little vain. But, heck, you might need it for your mental health, because it requires both concentration and a tapping into your subconscious self.. 

One obvious literary search for me is spiritual exploration. I’m too unconventional to merely pick an ideology and stick with it. It’s my nature to question everything and easy acceptance of a belief system is not very challenging. In other words, if you told me everything I simply must believe, I’d be forced to find reasons to disbelieve all of it. 

On the other hand, I believe in everything already. 

I was raised Southern Baptist, for the most part, though we never troubled over denominations. We were never made to attend church regularly, and we moved a lot, so we’d sometimes just go to whichever church was closest. I know we went to Methodist, Presbyterian, and Episcopalian churches along the way. Then I hit my teens and started questioning the inherent contradictions of Christian faith, as evidenced in Ronnie day’s struggles in The Red Church. I just couldn’t square the image of the smiling, merciful Jesus with the bearded old codger who’d roast me in the pits of hell for eternity if I didn’t shape up. 

One reviewer of The Red Church basically claimed that Baptists weren’t allowed to be in horror novels, that only Catholics could do horror right. Well, The Exorcist and Rosemary’s Baby are decent testaments to that theory, but I think such a position is small-minded. 

In my later teens, I was more in “free range” mode, thinking that spirituality meant taking drugs and reading hippie books about space cadets taking drugs and having spiritual experiences. As you can imagine, such a road led to the conclusion that once you’ve taken all the drugs, what else is left? However, I did get my first exposure to Taoism during that period, reading Lao Tzu’s Tao-te-King. 

My first wife was a Catholic and my children were christened in the faith. I attended services irregularly and waffled between being annoyed by the Catholic Church’s opulence and accepting whatever peace and grace it offered. But the pervert priests and the lies and the political cover-ups killed whatever fondness I had developed, and my then-wife later left the church for the same reasons. 

As a seeker, I have rubbed elbows with many different types of believers. I’ve hung out with Scientologists and Hindus and Buddhists, participated in Wiccan and pagan solstice ceremonies, and researched Satanism for my novel The Skull Ring, though I’ve only met a couple of professed Satanists. I developed a workable relationship with a higher power nearly five years ago while emerging from a personal Dark Ages. I don’t claim membership in any particular church, though in the last few years I’ve been to Methodist, Baptist, Episcopalian, Methodist, Church of Christ, and Catholic services. 

My current and final wife claims to be a Catholic, though she was kicked out of Catholic school in the seventh grade and has dragged me to most of those above services. She understands the deep hooks that the Catholic church manages to get into people, especially those indoctrinated at an early age. But we also talk a lot of about spiritual matters and have a shared set of basic morals and principals. 

On our first date, she gave me a book called “365 Tao,” a book of daily readings of Tao philosophy. “I just knew,” she said. We read entries from that book back and forth over the next year, and still hit it once in a while, because though the words stay the same, we change, and the tao changes, even as the tao stays the same. 

Taoism is more properly a philosophy than a religion, which is fine with me because it allows me to indulge in any religion I want. It’s more of a path of balance, a middle way, accepting yet also acting. It’s the path of a warrior who hopes to avoid conflict. It’s a path of embracing the death in the beauty of life, the eternal stream and circle of things. It even works on a scientific level, since matter can neither be created nor destroyed. 

Tao can’t even exist in its true form, and it can’t even be properly named. Can you see why it works for me? It’s a self-contained perfect contradiction. 

We each have our own personal journeys and our own personal relationships with the gods or makers or sets of empirical evidence of our choice. I’ve come to a point where I don’t need to worry about yours or mine. I think I’m okay. I believe you are, too. 

—————–

For every book of mine that hits the Top 100 during the tour, I will throw in an extra Kindle 3 giveaway. Tell your friends. Amaze your neighbors. Shock your therapist. 

Scott Nicholson is author of 12 novels, including the thrillers Speed Dating with the Dead, Drummer Boy, Forever Never Ends, The Skull Ring, As I Die Lying, Burial to Follow,and They Hunger. His revised novels for the U.K. Kindle are Creative Spirit, Troubled, and Solom. He’s also written four comic series, six screenplays, and more than 60 short stories.

His story collections include Ashes, The First, Murdermouth: Zombie Bits, and Flowers. 

To be eligible for the Kindle DX, simply post a comment below with contact info. Feel free to debate and discuss the topic, but you will only be entered once per blog. Visit all the blogs on the tour and increase your odds. I’m also giving away a Kindle 3 through the tour newsletter and a Pandora’s Box of free e-books to a follower of “hauntedcomputer” on Twitter. Thanks for playing. Complete details at http://www.hauntedcomputer.com/blogtour.htm


Comments closed … Thanks Scott and everyone who took the time to enter ! Best of luck in the drawing !

The Magical Message According to IÔANNÊS (St. John the Divine) by James M. Pryse E-Book Download | Knowledge Files

 

 

Commonly called the Gospel according to St. John. Are you ready for the esoteric message of the Gospel never before so clearly revealed? Contents: The Seen and the Unseen; The Four Evangels; The Drama of the Soul; Explanatory Note; The Magical Message according to Ioannes; The Prodigal Son; The Birth from Above; Index. St. John the mystic, calls to you. Listen to this inspiring message of faith, hope, love, and mystical achievement.

That the teaching of Iêsous was largely allegorical is clearly apparent from the subject matter of the four Evangels, as well as from such express statements as that in Matthew xiii. 34: ” ALL these things Iêsous spoke to the people in parables, and without a parable he did not speak [anything] to them.” That the teaching had an inner and concealed meaning, divulged only to the few who were worthy to receive it, is evident from many passages in the New Testament; and it was so held by all the early Christian sects, and plainly admitted by the patristic writers. But, in addition to this allegorical teaching, certain rules of right-conduct are given, which constitute, not a mere arbitrary code of ethics, but one based upon the laws of man’s inner nature, his relation to Deity, to Nature, and to his fellow-beings. It is only by living according to these rules of right-conduct that the will of the man comes into harmony with the will of The God ; and in Iôannês (vii. 17) the final test is laid down : ” If any one wills to do his will, he shall have knowledge about the teaching, whether it is from The God.”

Table of Contents 

Preface
The Seen and the Unseen
The Four Evangels
The Drama of the Soul
Explanatory Note
The Magical Message According to Iôannês
Appendix I., The Prodigal Son
Appendix II., The Birth from Above .
Index of Notes

Pages: 248 | Published: 1909 | Language: English

Download now

The Magical Message According to IÔANNÊS (St. John the Divine) by James M. Pryse E-Book Download | Knowledge Files

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