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Review: Close Encounters of the Fatal Kind

13 May

Close Encounters of the Fatal Kind: Suspicious Deaths, Mysterious Murders, and Bizarre Disappearances in UFO History
close encounterfatal

by Nick Redfern
Paperback: 224 pages
Publisher: New Page Books;  (June 23, 2014)
ISBN-10: 1601633114
ISBN-13: 978-1601633118

Available June 23, 2014 through Amazon (Close Encounters of the Fatal Kind: Suspicious Deaths, Mysterious Murders, and Bizarre Disappearances in UFO History)

Barry’s score — 5 stars out of 5.

My thoughts:

First let me start off by admitting a certain bias for Fortean research. UFOs, Bigfoot, and ghosts stories really make my day.  I am also a big fan of Nick Redfern’s research.  He really lays out his work and lets you the reader make your own conclusions.

In Close Encounters of the Fatal Kind, Redfern put together eighteen chapters with almost tabloid worthy titles.
Chapter 1: From Melting Man to Maury Island
Chapter 2: The Victims of Roswell
Chapter 3: Zapped by a UFO?
Chapter 4: Silenced on the 16th Floor
Chapter 5: Murder in Mind
Chapter 6: Flying Into Oblivion
Chapter 7: When Murder and Suicide Cross Paths
Chapter 8: A Contract on the Commander-in-Chief
Chapter 9: The Microwave Incident
Chapter 9: The Microwave Incident
Chapter 10: Suspicious Deaths and Secret Work
Chapter 11: A Deadly Disk in the Desert
Chapter 12: UFOs and Human Mutilations
Chapter 13: Death, Disappearance, and a Fatal Illness
Chapter 14: Another Adamski and Another Death
Chapter 15: The Highway to Hell
Chapter 16: Star Wars of the Deadly Kind
Chapter 17: The Tentacles of the Octopus
Chapter 18: A Killer Curse and a Deadly Date

On the downside, the pictures were a bit bland and rarely helped move the stories along. Some of the pictures were of official documents, and were needed, but the black&white landscapes were not helpful and the Maury Island FBI document is little more than a blob. Having said that, the cover art is absolutely fantastic.

The book is, as you might expect from a Redfern book, packed with documentation. The Bibliography should provide the beginner (or veteran) researcher with a fantastic resource. Most of the stories I remembered but several were  new to me. Close Encounters of the Fatal Kind was a joy to read and I quickly gobbled it up.

All in all, it was a fascinating read. I give Close Encounters of the Fatal Kind 5 out of 5 stars and highly recommend it for your home library.

Product description:

Everyone has heard of Close Encounters of the Third Kind. But what about close encounters of the fatal kind? The field of UFOs is rife with unsettling examples of suspicious deaths. Accounts of accidents that might not have been accidents after all, abound. Researchers and witnesses have vanished, never to be seen again. Conveniently timed heart attacks are reported.

Out-of-the-blue suicides that, upon investigation, bear the distinct hallmarks of murder, are all too common. And grisly deaths at the hands of both extraterrestrials and government agents have occurred.

Highlights of Close Encounters of the Fatal Kind include:

  • The strange saga of the incredible melting man.
  • The UFO-related death of the first U.S. Secretary of Defense, James Forrestal.
  • The mysterious disappearances of military pilots and their connection to UFOs.
  • The connections between national security and the sudden deaths of UFO investigators.

Getting too close to the cosmic truth about alien abductions, Roswell, and what the government really knows about UFOs can–clearly–be a deadly business. The government’s latest admission of the existence of Area 51 is barely the tip of a very big iceberg.


Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from New Page Books and Warwick Associates. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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